FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions:

 

What is equine-assisted grief counseling?

Equine-assisted grief counseling is a type of counseling that incorporates horses experientially for emotional growth.  In the counseling session, the clients actively participate in the activities and discuss feelings.  The activities are conducted by a team of professionals: a mental health professional, an equine specialist, and the horse.

 

What ages can participate in the activities at Mane Support?

Both children and adults can participate at Mane Support.  Because age does not always represent true comprehension, a child’s developmental level of understanding, rather than their chronological age, is viewed as one of the main determining factors for participation.  Each participant has the opportunity to meet the staff prior to beginning sessions and/or groups.

 

Why horses?

We use horses because they are so honest and have a “live in the moment” attitude.  For some, their size can be a true representation of the grief that is felt.  Additionally, horses do not have a schedule, so they don’t get in a hurry and forget something very important.  Being a moving, living animal reminds us how life doesn’t always stand still and that we have to move with it, as difficult as it may be.

 

Do you ride the horses during Mane Support sessions?

We do not ride at Mane Support.  All activities are conducted 100% on the ground.  This is in alignment with the EAGALA model standards.

 

 What other expressive activities do you do at Mane Support?

While our equine counselors are the primary component of the counseling that is provided, we do incorporate art, journaling, and creative expressionism into the counseling process at Mane Support.  In fact, our equine counselors have been known to be a canvas for some wonderful art work!

 

When do the activities at Mane Support take place?

Mane Support offers counseling year round, with groups and individual sessions scheduled Monday-Saturday.  Sunday our staff is always off to enjoy time as they choose.

 

Does Mane Support provide services other than counseling?

Yes, Mane Support provides community education, volunteer trainings, and corporate trainings to further understand and provide avenues for learning, communicating, and team building.

 

Does Mane Support partner with other agencies?

Mane Support works together with other agencies to provide a continuum of support for those that are hurting.  We are always pursuing innovative ways to assist those in their process of healing.

 

How can I become a part of Mane Support, either as a participant, referral source, volunteer, or financial sponsor?

To learn more click the word of what you are most interested in volunteering, donating, participating in a group, or contact us directly using the envelope icon with a specific idea or question.  We look forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Frequently Asked Questions of Volunteers

 

Do I need to have knowledge of horses and horsemanship skills to volunteer at Mane Support?
Absolutely not! In order to ensure the safety of all, even volunteers who have extensive experiences with horses, are trained and supervised by the staff at all times.  Every horse is as individual as each human, and the equine specialists continue to learn about the personality of each horse.  Mane Support is pleased to provide opportunities for volunteers who want to learn more about horse behavior, natural instincts, herd behavior, and care.

 

I am very afraid of horses, but I want to help Mane Support.  Is there anything I can do that does not involve horses?
Yes!  Mane Support volunteers assist with administrative tasks, maintaining the facilities and grounds, publicizing the program, fundraising, and participating in community awareness events.

 

Can I ride your horses?
Sorry, but no.  Mane Support’s facility manager is responsible for the daily training and exercise of the horses.

 

Does Mane Support reimburse volunteers for transportation costs?
No, but expenses related to volunteer activities may be tax deductible.  Contact your CPA or consult the IRS for further information.